Promoting Your Camp

One of the most important things to do is to share your Maker Camp with the community. Here are some ideas from previous Maker Camp Community Partners for letting people know you are hosting a Maker Camp.

Social Media

Social media is an expensive way to spread the word about your Maker Camp. Here are some tips to make your posts more effective.

  • On Facebook create a page, group and/or event for your camp. Pages are great if you want to have control over what is shared and can serve you as a website for your camp. Groups can be public or private. They are more interactive and can be great for staying in touch with parents. Events allow you to specifically list camp dates and invite those you think may be interested.

  • Customize your social media page with Maker Camp headers and profile pictures. We’ve created branded items for you, which you can find on our Digital Assets page.

  • Use hashtags to get your content seen. Always include #MakerCamp so we can see your awesome posts and support your work. Other great hashtags to use are are #Makers, #Makerspace, #MakerEducation, and #DIY. And never hesitate to make up your own too!

  • If you’ve hosted Maker Camps before, post your best photos to get people excited.

  • People love videos, so make short clips about your Maker Camp.

  • Share the posts of others and ask them to share yours. Create an online community that supports the work.

Print Materials

Make posters to share at local shops, your town hall, or the library. Create postcards to send to people that may be interested. Create small handouts for people to pick up at restaurants with take out orders or put a stack at the local coffee shop. We have samples under Digital Assets. Reach out to local newspapers with a press release.

Reach Out to the Community

Contact local schools, libraries, museums, churches, youth organizations, parent groups, homeschool co-ops, and/or recreation departments and ask them to help you promote your camp. You can also offer to host Maker Camp with them, bringing projects to their location on offering them online.

Attend Events

Identify local events such as craft markets of Farmer’s Markets where attendees may be interested in Maker Camp. Ask to host a table. (Often if you offer a free maker project for children you can negotiate a free table.) Speaking one-on-one with parents about Maker Camp is a great way to spread the word.

Promoting Your Camp

Promoting Your Camp

One of the most important things to do is to share your Maker Camp with the community. Here are some ideas from previous Maker Camp Community Partners for letting people know you are hosting a Maker Camp.

Social Media

Social media is an expensive way to spread the word about your Maker Camp. Here are some tips to make your posts more effective.

  • On Facebook create a page, group and/or event for your camp. Pages are great if you want to have control over what is shared and can serve you as a website for your camp. Groups can be public or private. They are more interactive and can be great for staying in touch with parents. Events allow you to specifically list camp dates and invite those you think may be interested.

  • Customize your social media page with Maker Camp headers and profile pictures. We’ve created branded items for you, which you can find on our Digital Assets page.

  • Use hashtags to get your content seen. Always include #MakerCamp so we can see your awesome posts and support your work. Other great hashtags to use are are #Makers, #Makerspace, #MakerEducation, and #DIY. And never hesitate to make up your own too!

  • If you’ve hosted Maker Camps before, post your best photos to get people excited.

  • People love videos, so make short clips about your Maker Camp.

  • Share the posts of others and ask them to share yours. Create an online community that supports the work.

Print Materials

Make posters to share at local shops, your town hall, or the library. Create postcards to send to people that may be interested. Create small handouts for people to pick up at restaurants with take out orders or put a stack at the local coffee shop. We have samples under Digital Assets. Reach out to local newspapers with a press release.

Reach Out to the Community

Contact local schools, libraries, museums, churches, youth organizations, parent groups, homeschool co-ops, and/or recreation departments and ask them to help you promote your camp. You can also offer to host Maker Camp with them, bringing projects to their location on offering them online.

Attend Events

Identify local events such as craft markets of Farmer’s Markets where attendees may be interested in Maker Camp. Ask to host a table. (Often if you offer a free maker project for children you can negotiate a free table.) Speaking one-on-one with parents about Maker Camp is a great way to spread the word.

Please Note

Your safety is your own responsibility, including proper use of equipment and safety gear, and determining whether you have adequate skill and experience. Power tools, electricity, and other resources used for these projects are dangerous, unless used properly and with adequate precautions, including safety gear and adult supervision. Some illustrative photos do not depict safety precautions or equipment, in order to show the project steps more clearly. Use of the instructions and suggestions found in Maker Camp is at your own risk. Maker Media, Inc., disclaims all responsibility for any resulting damage, injury, or expense.